Page 8 - Northern Star Fall 2020 Edition
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STAR
The Northern
 URGENT NEED
Call 24/7 412-364-5556
Text 412-444-7660
Chat www.crisiscenternorth.org
Help us get essentials to victims of domestic violence who don’t have access to products to keep them safe. Even if you are only able to spare a single item on this list from your supply, that’s one survivor served who may currently have nothing.
   Needs include:
• Face masks
• Disposable gloves
• Hand sanitizers and soap
• Disinfectant sprays and wipes
• Toilet paper
• Paper towels
• Gift cards to grocery stores, Amazon, and restaurants for food delivery
• Monetary donations to CCN to help continue our essential services
 ICN T I M A T E P A R T N E R V I O L E N C E O N U N I V E R S I T Y C A M P U S E S
olleges and universities have a follow Title IX. This title was originally notorious history of their students enacted to prohibit federally funded experiencing domestic violence educational institutions from discriminating
 during their attendance. The term “domestic violence” includes, but is not limited to, date rape, sexual assault and physical abuse. Although these institutions create a façade that they are strongly against these attacks, they still continue to have some of the highest numbers of assaults reported: roughly 1 out of every 5 college students have experienced violence by their partner at some point.
In a 2017 study, over 40 percent of women in intimate relationships, while attending a college or university, said they have experienced abusive behaviors within their relationship. Domestic violence is a huge issue within the population of young women. Statistics show that women between the ages of 16-24 have experienced the most domestic violence than any other demographic. The statistics are often low-balled and only make up for a small portion of actual domestic violence cases: only 33 percent of victims report their abuse.
In an attempt to lower the domestic violence prevalence on campus, every college and university is required by the United States Department of Education to
against students or employees based on their sex, but mainly focused on athletics and the inequality that occurred between men’s and women’s sports. Title IX forces institutions to investigate any report of domestic violence as well as provide support and protection from their abusers. The shortcoming of Title IX is that it does not hold up in the court of law – there is a gap between jail time and protection orders. More often than not, if a college issues a protective order, it does not protect the victim from abuse away from campus. Once the victim leaves the institution, the protective order is not recognized, which leaves the student vulnerable to abuse. Besides Title IX, colleges and universities are also required to provide statistics of all domestic violence incidents, known as the Clery Act. The Act comes with a plethora of issues, as it allows for universities to police their own campus and report their version of the statistics. Many institutions do not properly collect the data or refuse to acknowledge incidences of reports as to avoid reporting their high numbers.
Even with the federal protection laws set in place, there is still not much being done to
fix the deep-seated issue. Abusers do not face any sort of repercussions, which has led to a bigger discussion about colleges and universities to hold these abusers accountable. Programs and support groups have been established by students to provide assistance to domestic violence victims. These actions are not enough. Abusers need to be held accountable for their actions and need to be properly punished. In many cases, abusers are given suspensions that are effective after graduation, or told they are not allowed back on campus after graduating. The education of the abusers is set above the victim’s, and that needs to change. Educational institutions need to be held accountable for not properly addressing the domestic violence that runs rampant on their campuses, and abusers need to be held accountable for their actions.










































































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